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ravenclaw-burning:

optometrictzedek:

zinge:

jewish-mccoy:

jessicamiriamdrew:

giographixnola:

jewishdragon:

janothar:

theforestsoulbird:

optometrictzedek:

fromchaostocosmos:

jessicamiriamdrew:

jessicamiriamdrew:

Friendly October reminder not to put Spock or other Jewish characters in costumes with horns

to clarify: it is an antisemitic idea that Jews have horns (dating to a mistranslation of karan (shone) v keren (horns) ) which was perpetuated in art by the likes of Michelangelo. this is not a thing of the past–some gentiles still believe that jewish people have horns, and putting jewish characters in costumes/aus with horns is insensitive at best and also really fuckin gross

also do not depict Jewish characters as demons there is a very long history of Jews being seen as demons and that being used to kill us 

please do not dress Jewish characters in costumes that are priest outfit or nun outfit or with crosses 

Just to give y'all an idea of how modern the horn issue is: My dad, when he went to college in the early 1980’s, was asked by someone who had never met a Jew before where his horns were. In the 1980’s. My dad was asked where his horns were. This was only 30 years ago. I have been lucky not to deal with that particular stereotype in my lifetime, but that was less than a decade before I was born. And I know other Jews in areas where Jews are scarce have dealt with this much more recently than the 80’s.

Yup. When my mom went to college, her freshman year roommate woke up the first Sunday and started getting dressed for church. My mom was still in bed, so the roommate came over and woke her up.

Roommate: Did you want to come to church with me, or do you have your own church you’re going to?

Mom: Well, I don’t really go to religious services, but if I did I would go to a synagogue, not a church, because I’m Jewish.

(Long silence. My mom opens one eye to see her roommate staring in shock.)

Roommate: You … you don’t look Jewish.

Mom: (Who looks VERY Jewish) What do you mean?

Roommate: Well, my pastor always told me that Jews have horns and a tail.

Long story short: they didn’t end up getting along very well.

@optometrictzedek and @theforestsoulbird, it’s more recent than that.

I’ve been asked about my horns as recently as 1997.  In a public school in New Jersey.

It would b cool of my non-Jewish followers to reblog this!!! Spread this bc it’s scary and real and you should know!

Nope, nope, nope… I’m calling hearsay and shenanigans here. No one I have ever met has thought that Jews had horns. And I’ve met A LOT of people. I understand that despite the number of people I have met and known this isn’t a supporting argument but you would have to be pretty damn stupid to believe in such crap. If anything, I could believe these things were said as a joke, perhaps in poor taste, but not said seriously.

Hey why don’t you listen to actual Jewish people like the ones in the reblogs above you and all over the reblogs and notes in this post before you decide none of them were serious. People still ask this. Why the fuck would I make a post about it otherwise? It’s the result of thousands of years of antisemitism that people believe horrible things about Jewish people that seem unlikely. But people do believe them and do ask these questions.

listen to jews…it’s not a hard concept. why are people so intent on talking over us

No, but really. How could people go their whole life never seeing a photo of a human with horns and a tail, never seeing one horned human walking down the street, never see a movie where an actor has horns, never see a horned person at the mall, but still think theres a population of people walking around who have visible horns and a tail and that by SOME CHANCE they just never saw these people walking around with conspicuous horns and tails?

Antisemitism makes people do some shit and believe some shit that just doesn’t make any logical sense. I swear. I will never understand how a mind can believe all these obviously untrue things that are so harmful. How you can look someone in the face and say “You don’t look Jewish! You don’t have demon horns,” and not reconsider how rude that is to say right to someone’s face to even start with, let alone just how bigotted it is in context.

But I’m glad I can’t comprehend this backwards logic…

Honestly, fuck anyone who calls me and/or my dad a liar. It was *not* a joke. There are only 15 million Jews in the entire world, we make up roughly 0.02% of the entire world’s population, and people (especially before the internet but definitely still now) who grow up and live without ever coming in contact with Jews who are raised on Christian Evangelical anti-semitism really buy into this shit. And then when they finally learn that they are in the presence of Jews and they’re confronted with the reality that their religious teachings about the Evil Jooz was wrong, they’re at a complete loss. This is *not* uncommon, it happens to Jews literally all the time, so if you would just shut up and listen to us that would be fucking great.

Okay, I am possibly uniquely qualified to contribute to this, as I was raised an evangelical Protestant Christian in the American South, and am now Jewish and married to a woman who was raised Jewish.

1. There ABSOLUTELY ARE people who sincerely believe “the Jews” have horns. I have met them. I went to church with them. I know it sounds unreal, but people do exist who believe this. (You guys, there are people who believe the earth is flat. This isn’t that far-fetched.) There aren’t that many Jews in the world so if you’ve never met one, and if you’re raised with the insular, magical-thinking, us-vs-them mindset that evangelical Christianity requires, it’s not that much of a stretch to believe that there are actual horned people out there. Especially since certain evangelical denominations *still* teach that Jews are responsible for the death of Jesus (spoiler alert: we’re not) and that we are “incomplete” because we’re not Christians (further spoiler alert: we’re fine as we are). There’s a lot of history behind that stereotype and a lot of anti-Semitism that still runs deep in American evangelical culture.

2. My wife, who was raised Jewish all over the US and in a couple of different countries (military kid), was asked flat-out where her horns were on several different occasions growing up in the 80s. It’s a thing that happens, even to this day. But you already know that, because several Jewish people on this thread have already told you about that.

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